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Research Data Management Courses and Training

Browse below to see various Research Data Management Courses and Training available at the University of Cambridge

Research Data Management:

 


Research Data Management

Managing your data:

register your interest if the date of the next workshop is not scheduled yet

Come over to our introductory workshop to research data management and learn how not to get lost in our own research data (and how not to lose your data!).
The workshop will cover the following aspects of research data management:

  • Data storage and backup;
  • Data organisation;
  • Strategies for file exchange with collaborators;
  • Sharing research data;
  • How to create data management plans.

The workshop is open to all students and postdocs, and refreshments will be provided.

if you would like to come to the session, register directly on the event page

Open Data lunchtime sessions will: provide you with all the necessary information you need to know about your funder requirements for research data sharing, tell you how to avoid sanctions for non-compliance with your funder policies, allow you to ask any questions you might have directly to the Open Data team. Sessions are open to everyone: principal investigators, postdocs, research staff, administrative staff, students.

You can download our slides here.

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Description: This course is delivered by the University’s Research Governance and Integrity Officer and introduces researchers to research integrity and ethics at Cambridge. The course will: explore the issue of research misconduct in academia and facilitate discussion of why and how it occurs; explain the recent research integrity agenda and examine how this effects researchers; discuss some of the challenges to the integrity of research and ask what individuals, groups and institutions can do to tackle them; introduce the University’s research ethics system; use case studies and discussion exercises to examine key issues

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Description: This one hour lecture from the Library staff will cover organising and preserving your data and aspects of research ethics including confidentiality, integrity and data sharing. Part of Engineering Research Skills Lecture Series

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Description: (session 1): Searching the Literature; Resources for research in Engineering; Search techniques and strategies; Using reference managers to gather references; Accessing resources (including an introduction to Open Access); (session 2): Working with the Literature; Critical appraisal techniques; Academic reading and note-taking; Referencing and reference management; Research ethics: Plagiarism and copyright; (session 3): Managing your Research Data; Data management planning; Organising data; Data preservation; Research ethics: Confidentiality, Integrity, Data sharing.  Part of Engineering Research Skills Lecture Series

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Description: Your lab notebook is one of the most important and precious objects you, as a scientist, will ever have. This course will explore how keeping an exemplary laboratory notebook is crucial to good scientific practice in lab research. The course will consist of a short talk, a chance to assess some examples of good and bad practice, with plenty of time for questions and discussion. You might like to bring along your own lab notebook for feedback. (Please note that issues relating to protection of Intellectual Property Rights will not be covered in this course).


Data Sharing

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Description: Issues relating to Open Access, Open Data, including its significance for university research evaluations, the differences between Green and Gold Open Access, funder and publisher requirements and services that are available to help you.There will be an opportunity for you to ask questions, highlight areas of concern and suggest ways to make Open Access compliance easier for researchers. Part of Engineering Research Skills Lecture Series

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Description: Issues relating to Open Access as they relate to doctoral researchers, including its significance for university research evaluations, the differences between Green and Gold Open Access, funder and publisher requirements, electronic deposit for PhD theses at the Department of Engineering and services that are available to you. Part of Engineering Research Skills Lecture Series


Data protection, Intellectual Property and Ethics:

Description: This course is crucial for any administrators who may find themselves in possession of either personal data, or sensitive personal data, as defined by the Data Protection Act. If you don't know what the Act means by personal data, this is your chance to find out. The course will take about 30 minutes to work through. If it prevents you or a colleague losing data or becoming a victim of identity theft, that time will be more than worth it.

Description: This course is designed for researchers and will support you in taking care of your research data. It is crucial for any researchers who may find themselves in possession of either personal data, or sensitive personal data, as defined by the Data Protection Act. If you don't know what the Act means by personal data, this is your chance to find out. This course will take about 30 minutes to work through. If it prevents you or a colleague losing research data or becoming a victim of identity theft, that time will be more than worth it.

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Description:The rights and responsibilities outlined in the Data Protection and Freedom of Information Acts increasingly impact upon the University’s academic and administrative work. This course explores the key concepts in the Data Protection Act 1998 and illustrates how the ‘data protection principles’ affect various day-to-day working scenarios. It introduces the fundamental aspects of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 and details the ways in which the University handles responses to individual requests under both Acts. Finally, it outlines various records management and information security measures that can aid compliance with the legislation and lead to a more efficient working environment.

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Description: This lecture will provide you with some of the vocabulary and ideas behind intellectual property (copyright, patents, confidentiality agreements) in the context of University Research. A useful starting point, which could prevent you making costly mistakes in the future. Part of Engineering Research Skills Lecture Series.

Description: A workshop of two half-day sessions that are one week apart, developing: Knowledge of critical thinking, with respect to logic and argument development; Skills in application of critical thinking using case studies and debate involving bioethics

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Description: Ethics is becoming an increasingly important issue for researchers. This module will demonstrate the practical value of thinking seriously and systematically about what constitutes ethical conduct in social science research. The sessions will involve some small-group work. This module is part of the Social Science Research Methods Centre training programme which is a shared platform for providing research students with a broad range of quantitative and qualitative research methods skills that are relevant across the social sciences.


Tools

  • Opus - keep track of your data

Description: The DTG group in the Computer Lab have a tool called OPUS for Linux users designed to help in the aid of data lineage collection. OPUS is program and workflow agnostic and requires no special steps or actions to be taken by the user.  Once installed OPUS runs transparently in the background requiring no user intervention. It seamlessly intercepts and records all user and program actions logging them to a database on the machine.
For outputs for which the source data is required (e.g. a text file produced by a program, PDF paper or PNG graph etc) the user runs a command and OPUS is able to provide all the input files, data and commands required to reconstruct the output.  It can provide this information across a chain of multiple steps too.
OPUS also provides extended facilities, e.g. package the programs and data required to produce an output in a manner which allows an external party to reproduce the results. It is designed to be extensible to other use-cases which we may have not yet identified. 

If you are interested in knowing more about or using this tool, please contact us on rss39@cam.ac.uk.  Information can also be found at: https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/research/dtg/fresco/opus/